Expressive writing activities

In your writing, really let go and explore the event and how it has affected you. You might tie this experience to your childhood, your relationship with your parents, people you have loved or love now, or even your career. Write continuously for 20 minutes.

Expressive writing activities

Contact Group Activities Here is a list of ideas that I have employed at various times in a mental health setting for groups of adults, children, and teens.

You are lost at sea on a stormy night. You see a glimmer of light leading you to land. If you row hard, you can make it. Someone waits for you with a warm meal, dry clothes, and a place to rest. Draw, color, or paint an image of a lighthouse as a source of guidance in your life.

Depict yourself somewhere in the image, either in a boat on the water, in the lighthouse, etc. Add words to represent your sources of guidance in life, i. Joyful Memory Everyone shares the most joyful memory that comes to mind.

Each person directs the scene, casting group members in the various roles, including him or herself. Participant watches the scene and comments on the feelings and memories that come up. Clients take six strips of paper each. Write three Negative Messages or beliefs on three of the paper strips; i.

Expressive Writing | Practice | Greater Good in Action

Write three Powerful, Positive Responses to the messages on the other three paper strips; i. I have confidence in my abilities. Form two rows of three standing opposite each other. Let participants choose if they want to be in the "Good" row or the "Evil" row.

A participant gives one of his Negative Messages to each person in the "Evil" row. He gives the corresponding Powerful, Positive Response paper to the person in the "Good" row that is facing the "Evil" side. The participant stands between the first pair as they read the messages on the sheets and try to influence the participant using ad lib sentences.

The "Evil" person extends her arm out to block the participant from passing. You are always so slow.

expressive writing activities

Participant repeats process with next pair until finished with all three pairs. Repeat for each person. Friendship Mural Big banner: Resilience Draw, color, or paint an image of a being in nature that survives in a harsh environment: Violence Discuss quote from Elie Wiesel: Participants complete the following sentences for a journaling activity: Someone who is violent toward others is trying to Someone who is violent toward himself is trying to Someone I have trouble communicating with is What I really need is What I wish people would understand about me is Powerful Ally Think of a person or character, real or imaginary, who is powerful, strong, or wise.

Remember a time you felt alone, scared, out of control, or helpless. Imagine that the Powerful Person is there with you during the experience, either offering help or just being with you. Participants enact the memories with the Powerful Person present in the scene.

Client plays herself in the scene. Inner Child Draw yourself as a child on your paper. Add images and words to give this child everything that it needs, including a supportive nurturing parent. In the first section, list your gifts, strengths, talents, including abilities and personal qualities.Group Activities.

Here is a list of ideas that I have employed at various times in a mental health setting for groups of adults, children, and teens. 1. Lighthouse. Visualization: You are lost at sea on a stormy night.

You see a glimmer of light leading you to land. If you row hard, you can make it. Sapp, Karla L., "Unsilencing the Voice Within: Expressive Writing as a Therapeutic Tool" ().National Youth-At-Risk Conference Savannah.

had stopped participating in activities Unsilencing the Voice Within: Expressive Writing as a Therapeutic Tool. Here is a popular internet list of art therapy activities originally posted up several years ago by the Nursing School Blog, and as time has gone by over half of the links have become defunct or out of date.

I have researched current links that reflect the most vibrant and inspiring art therapy directives on the internet today, while aiming to keep it as . Preface “Incorporating Expressive Writing into the Classroom” investigates the effectiveness of “active learning” strategies, particularly short writing activities, which.

Expressive Therapy Ideas. Writing Activities Writing Ideas Writing Goals Girl Scout Activities Writing Prompts For Kids Fun Activities Life Skills Activities Writing Topics Holiday Activities. things i want to do in my life-- great for journaling or writing starters!

Or things I want to write about this year! Expressive Art. Expressive writing is required for academic success, job applications, and for many careers.

However, expressive writing presents challenges because it is not a single skill. Expressive writing is a cluster of skills that includes mental tasks such as idea creation and planning as well as mechanical tasks such as ordering words into sentences.

Expressive Writing | Psychology Today